Next to the main road there lies the ridge. Pedestrians commute mostly in the morning or the late afternoon while the rest time of the day a 2.3 km trail loop makes a natural track for traffic-free running.

In November 2018, I recorded a 30-minute sound sample on jogging on the ridge then converted it into a montage piece named 'Footing', which was later used as the soundscape for the exhibition 'GAME ON'. The exhibit was completed after spending nights and days co-working with friends in the gallery space. In the preparation weekend before the opening day, I had managed to hold the fatigue level to race a road 10K PB following on the work shift of late Saturday night. On returning to the project space the same Sunday afternoon, there was a moment I was standing still alone and contemplating, surrounded by all equipment and materials unfinished. All of sudden, a decision to be made clear in my mind: I need to find alternative areas to install, demonstrate and exhibit the Project Artisthlete.

There is something debatable about the conventional setup for an exhibition. It addresses the relationship between either human to human: the dressing code and 'mingle' custom during the 'vernissage' or Private View; or human and artefacts: the 'archive viewing' experience led by the circumstance of careful and conserved manner.

For a viewer, energy is much conserved during their visiting experience and it is not simply their fault. The responsibly of creating an 'ideal' or sometimes 'perfect' viewing indoor environment by artists and curators does eventually prevent the viewer from approaching both the subject and object.

Taking running as an example, we know there is never a permanent control of conditions in the outdoor space by having the shifting environment with the various ever-changing factors including temperatures, surfaces and human or animal encounters through the hours of night and day. In the opposite way, by swiping the membership card to the gym, the wonderland of exercise unveiled: air conditioner's temperature, energised music, technically well-maintained and command-able treadmills... This is the 'green light' and you are ready to go. Everything is in control but it feels somehow surrealistic and absurd.

So to finalise the gallery-install meditation, here we can draw the single word quoted from Ken Loach's filmwork 'Looking for Eric (2009)': No(n). To the gallery exhibited.

To run is to live.

The Ridge